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Available in three different packages

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CD Version

Special 180 Gram Vinyl Release

CD and Vinyl Combo


Branching Roots

For the first time in 30 years, Paul is excited to release this project on 180 Gram Vinyl with Duo-Fold Jacket. 

BRANCHING ROOTS REVIEW 

 

Recording veteran, Paul Clark, digs deeper into the soil with his 20th solo release, "Branching Roots". Burrowing into 11 new compositions with Clark, and his vast array of vintage string and percussion instruments, are the exquisite talents of multi-Award winning fiddler and mandolinist, Stuart Duncan; guitar legend and longtime recording friend, Phil Keaggy; veteran upright bass players, Byron House and Matt Pierson; old school pedal steel player, Tom Killen; rising Resophonic picker, Ian O'Bryant and gritty background vocalist, Charity Mozafari. Mixed by Todd Robbins, mastered by Reuben Cohen of Lurssen Mastering, and the vinyl lacquers mastered by the iconic Ron McMaster at Capitol Records, Branching Roots will likely cause a thirst for a water that can quench the driest of souls.

 

With four decades plus of songwriting, recording and producing under his belt, Clark continues to draw upon his unique ability to find fresh water from a genre he's yet to visit. While most artists refine the signature that got them there, Clark seems intent on punctuating his previous work with a period, then boldly turns the page and effortlessly starts writing a new chapter to his journey. His undisputed calling to craftily deliver the story between the lines, be it Biblical narrative, or biographically transparent, is once again on full display. Stripped down musically from his last project, "Down At The Whistle," fresh rain from his fellow musicians allows Clark's underrated instrumental skills to stretch out to the drip line and beyond. Unknown to the  industry that he and a few other pioneers dug out of the dirt, and equally absent from secular music conversation, Clark seems unconcerned with the need of recognition from anyone other than his audience of One.

 

Equally impressive to his music production abilities is Clark's eye for design and photography. It's obvious that Clark's roots started in vinyl. Steeped in the artful Vitruvius triad of function, strength and beauty, his work has a cadence birthed from an era where conceptualism was the norm. Holding the record jacket in your hands is like caressing a work of art. If you were there, opening the gatefold and reading the lyrics, while listening to Paul's music, will awaken your soul to a time when people really listened. If you're new to Paul's art, be prepared for a season of deep root growth. Branching Roots will never leave you parched.